GLP Beijing | Student Blog
A word journey into our travels at home and abroad. Follow us as we learn about business across cultures and explore the opportunities available to us with the world as our classroom.
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— Post-trip blog

It’s been two weeks since returning from China, but it feels like I just landed yesterday! I truthfully did not know what to expect from the trip, but I came back to the States with such a greater understanding for Chinese culture and business practices. Even deeper than that, I grew closer with my GLP classmates and learned how to be a global citizen. So many things in China were different- I couldn’t eat half of the food or communicate with a majority of the people, but I figured things out as I went along. That’s the beauty of travel- you have to improvise and make do in any situation you’re placed in.

I was really missing China right after I got back to USC, but luckily I’ll be back! I was chosen to participate in the internship program this summer meaning that I will be living in either Hong Kong, Taipei, Shanghai or Beijing this summer. I know it’s going to be a challenge to adapt, but I am beyond excited to take on a new adventure and intern abroad.

GLP has been one of the highlights of my freshman year. I’ve been exposed to so many areas of business through our guest speakers, learned about business practices abroad, and most importantly, made some friendships I know will last!

-Zoe

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— Beijing: a timeless city of wonders - Ling Zeng

It’s almost been a week since we’ve been back, but there’s not been a single day, a single hour, since I stepped off the plane at LAX that I haven’t thought to myself “Take me back to China”

Shanghai was the modern and glamorous end of the spectrum of China, but Beijing was the ageless and powerful mecca of Chinese culture and history. There was something about the city that seemed timeless. Even through all the urbanization and westernization, Beijing was still…Beijing - it still represented the heart of China and there was something distinctly Chinese about it that no amount of commercialization could take away.

When we arrived there on Wednesday, we headed immediately to the Great Wall. We took cable cars up to the Wall itself (much less exhausting than when I physically walked up through the jungle-y madness to get to the Wall last summer) where we spent about 45 minutes traversing the Wall itself. It was some intense physical labor, for sure, but the view from the Wall and just knowing that you were standing on something so spectacular, so old, so powerful, and with so much history, was enough to make the effort well worth it. It was a treat to be able to walk along the Great Wall with my fellow GLP-ers; it definitely helped in cementing the bond we were starting to form with each other on the trip. People say that traveling really helps bond you closer with those that you travel with. I would say that climbing the Great Wall is something that does that too. It’s hard to imagine that the wall we walked on was built thousands of years ago by workers who laid one brick on top of another, brick after brick…being on the Great Wall made me realize how large the world was, and how small I was. Life doesn’t revolve around us or USC; there is so much more going on outside of our little bubble in Los Angeles. It wasn’t a feeling of insignificance, but rather a humbling feeling that allowed me to take a step out from the small world I lived in and look from the outside inward.

Afterwards, we took the bus back into the city to explore the Forbidden City and Tian’an Men Square. The Great Wall may be the cultural icon of China and Beijing, but the Forbidden City and Tian’an Men were the cultural and political centers, respectively.

For dinner, we ate a delicious Peking duck dinner - courtesy of USC - as a whole GLP group with both teams 1 and 2 together. It sort of felt like a family reunion; all of the us sat at one of 8 large round tables, where we ate and talked like one giant family. Sadly, team 2 had to leave us after dinner to head to the train station where they would ride to Shanghai overnight, but at least we were able to spend one whole day together as a unified GLP team.

Company visits resumed on Thursday, but the very first presentation we had was from a woman called Leslie Haro. She was one of my favorite speakers/presenters because of her optimistic personality and courage to push herself out of her comfort zone. She had decided to go to China on a whim when she was 17 - a place where she had no home, no family, no friends or connections, and no knowledge of the language. She did this because she wanted to do something new, something fresh, and something challenging. I don’t know if I would ever have the courage to do something like she did, but what I did take away from her talk was the importance of learning to be comfortable with the uncomfortable.

After Leslie Haro’s talk, we visited Zynga, the world’s largest social game service. I loved how candid and frank the 3 representatives who spoke to us were. Zynga had been struggling a bit with their gaming business lately, but were trying to pick up the pace by developing mobile gaming apps. What stood out to me was their optimism towards competition. They welcomed competition, even liked and encouraged it, because it continually pushed them as a technology-based company to be even better.

Our last company visit of the day was at Baidu, sort of like the “Google” of China (although they prefer not to be described that way). The representative there took us on a tour of the building, which was incredibly innovative and sleek in design, and also showed us some of the apps they had been developing and launched, including a 3D map app and a very cool menu translator that translated menus in different languages into a language you could read. One of my favorite parts of the tour was seeing the sleeping rooms, rooms dedicated solely to the purpose of afternoon napping! The Baidu representative also said that at Baidu, there are no designated work hours, so people were free to take short naps whenever they wanted because they didn’t have to fit in all their hours within a specific time frame. Later she engaged in a Q & A session with us, where once again, I noticed the theme of healthy competition arise in business. Baidu also encouraged and wanted competition in order to continually innovate and better themselves as a technological and service provider.

After our visit to Baidu, we got to visit the Silk Market to do some retail observation and practice our bargaining/negotiating skills yet again. This time, I wasn’t so lucky. I tried to get a bag for 50 RMB, but I ended just making the entire basement floor (the handbag floor) dislike my friend and I…

Friday was our last day of company visits! The first place we visited was Gee Toys, which was located about an hour and half away from our hotel. What was very cool about Gee Toys was that they took us through the factory where we got to see workers actually make stuffed animals. Gee Toys is a toy company based in China that has already expanded to countries such as Canada and in Western Europe. They hope to continually expand on a global level.

Our very last “company visit” was more of a show-and-tell. After lunch, a man called Dominic Johnson came in and talked to us about his business called Plastered T’s, which makes T-shirts and prints designs on them that reflect Beijing culture and history. Dominic Johnson is from England, but he considers himself a Beijing native (not just an ex-pat). What I admire about him is his dedication to adhering to what his T-shirt company was founded on - to express Beijing culture and history through design. He told us he will not localize his products even if he does expand globally because he doesn’t want anything to compromise the integrity of the “Beijing” in his T-shirts. Beijing is his home and he is proud to showcase it. I approached him after the talk and while talking to him, I discovered that he is not only the creative and carefree guy that runs Plastered T’s, but also an incredibly humble and life-loving man. He told me that every morning, he wakes up and writes down things that he is grateful for and goes for a morning exercise jog. He stressed the importance of living life with an attitude of gratitude, which I noticed is a recurring theme for successful leaders. This is definitely something I will take away from my visit to China - the importance of appreciation and giving thanks to everyone who deserves it.

Afterwards, we got the chance to visit his shop in the Hutongs and explore the Hutongs themselves! The Hutongs are traditional courtyard residencies that Beijing natives traditionally lived in. They formed a sort of tight-knit community. The hutong we visited was a commercialized version of one, with many shops along the alleyways. I stopped and got some delicious lemon-grapefruit-honey tea from a cute tea shop and browsed some of the antique stores as well.

On Saturday, some other GLP-ers and I went to the Temple of Heaven, went shopping, and spent our last night out and about in the city. I realized that I loved my time here in Beijing just as much as I loved my time in Shanghai, which was surprising to me as I expected to like Shanghai more. Beijing may not be as glamorous or as shiny as Shanghai is, but its a gem nonetheless.

-Ling Zeng

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— First Day in Beijing- Taylor Serafin

On Wednesday night, all of Team 1 jumped on an overnight train to Beijing. It was unlike anything I have ever done before. There were twelve compartments in which four people could sleep for the night. Even with the bunk beds on each side, the compartments were very small. In my room, we did not even have a place to walk as the tiny slither of floor was completely covered by all of our luggage. Even though it may not seem like the most glamorous way to travel, it was really fun. It definitely was a new experience for the majority of us and that made it cool in itself.

Upon our arrival in Beijing, we met up with Team 2 at the hotel. Then as a collective unit we traveled to the Great Wall. Hiking the Great Wall was such a humbling experience. I could not help but imagine what it must have been like to build it. It is just hard to imagine building a huge wall in order to protect your country from potential threats. I wonder what it must have been like for the people who walked it, not as a sightseeing hike but with a purpose and a need for protection.

Hiking the Great Wall, however, was not a piece of cake. Some of the stairs are 2 inches tall and others are over a foot tall. At first, you are annoyed by the 2 inch “steps,” but then you become happy to see them when your legs and thighs burn from the huge ones. However, once you get along far enough on the wall you forget the pain and just take in the amazing view.

After climbing the Great Wall, we traveled to the Forbidden City. It was really cool to walk around it due to the sheer size of it. The architecture of it was beautiful with all of the statues of animals and huge marble slabs with lots of tiny carvings. The colors of the main buildings were primarily red which made them stand out. Seeing the Forbidden City was one of my favorite parts of the trip.

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— Jewel of the East, called Beijing - Ling Zeng

Before I talk about my time in Beijing, I just want to apologize for not having any photos with me to upload at this moment (I left my phone on a cab on the way back to the hotel, unfortunately…)

Beijing has been amazing. I traveled here last summer with my family, but at that time, I didn’t like it quite so much. I thought the city was too boring, too bland, too vapid and slow-paced compared to the modern and glamorous Shanghai. When I climbed the Great Wall and visited the Forbidden City, it was incredibly hot - that and getting a mild heat stroke on the Great Wall did not combine to leave a good impression in my memory.

This time couldn’t have been any more different. As we stepped off the train as it slid into Beijing station at 7 am Wednesday morning, the air was crisp and cool. It was pretty chilly, and I regretted not wearing more layers. This cold weather turned out to be perfect while climbing the Great Wall, however. We took a cable car up to the Wall, and climbed a stretch of it, and let me tell you, it was quite a workout! The steps sometimes were so steep that my knee reached my nose whenever I took a step up (this is no exaggeration). It was an exhilarating climb, though. The view from the wall was like none other, and I wish I could post some of the many photos I took! Unfortunately, on our way down, it started drizzling so the toboggan was closed and we took the cable car down again.

After the Great Wall, we headed to the Forbidden City, the palace of the Chinese emperors. The entire palace complex was so majestic; in every corner and around every pillar was so much rich history and culture. I got to visit Tian’an Men Square that afternoon as well, which was something new for me. The plaza was so vast and spacious!

That evening we had a delicious Peking duck dinner with all of GLP, and at that moment, I really began to feel the bond of family with my fellow GLP-ers. There’s something about traveling together and climbing the Great Wall together that brings you closer towards people. After the dinner and our hugs and goodbyes, Team 2 left to take the overnight train to Shanghai.

I’ll be posting more about the company visits and take-aways soon, so look out for those! :)

-Ling Zeng

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— [Amy] Saying goodbye to the City of Angels

Friday-Sunday felt like one, extremely long day. Our flight left LAX for Incheon, Korea on Saturday, March 16 at around 12:30am. The flight was about 13.5 hours long, but was definitely the best flight I’ve ever been on. Okay, so I don’t fly often, but I think Asiana beats United or Jet Blue any day. There was a great selection of movies, including The Book Thief, Ender’s Game, Frozen, and Tangled, great service, and great food!

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My first meal on our flight to Incheon!  

I got about 7-8 hours of much-needed rest before we all arrived in Incheon. Since it was about 6am in Korea when we arrived, the airport was fairly empty, and very few of the shops/restaurants were open. After an hour or two, some of them began to open, and I was able to order Udon noodles for 6500 won, which amounts to less than $7 at a restaurant called Delisky. I also bought myself a custard-filled chocolate bear donut at Dunkin’ Donuts next door for the trip to Beijing. 

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We left Incheon for Beijing at around 8:30am, and although our flight was 2 hours long, we arrived at 9:30am due to the time zone differences. After checking in at the Beijing Marriot, several friends and I made our way to Foodcube, a restaurant down the street from our hotel recommended to us by our tour guide, Benny. My friend Katie and I shared a dish of Kung Pao Chicken (25元) and each ordered a bowl of rice (2元), and then we rushed back to the hotel just in time to leave for the Beijing Olympic Village. 

Although we weren’t able to go into the Water Cube or the Bird’s Nest, we were able to see the amazing buildings and admire them from afar. We also drove by the Galaxy Soho, which according to our tour guide is a large building that houses many small, entrepreneurial businesses. 

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My favorite part of the day, however, was the time we spent in Beijing Park. We first went to see the Temple of Heaven (天坛) and then were allowed to roam the park until 4pm. At Beijing Park, we were able to gain more insight into the daily lives of the people in Beijing, particularly the elderly. We saw two elders engaged in an intense ping pong battle behind others who were gambling, playing Mahjong or Chinese Chess. We watched women dressed in brightly-colored clothing dancing freely in the middle of the park, and a few of my friends and I took a chance and decided to join them. As our time at the park came to a close, Katie and I followed the sound of drums to an impressive gathering of people singing a song neither of us recognized, but which sounded very nationalistic and proud. Although I discovered the singing after they had already started, I was able to climb on top of a rock to take a video of their singing. 

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After we left, we visited a small Tea House outside the park, where we learned about some of the tea traditions in China, as well as about the different kinds of Chinese tea. The tea was extremely delicious, particularly the Jasmine and Fruit teas, but a lot of the products in the tea house were extremely expensive, so I decided to buy tea elsewhere. 

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At the Silk Market, we were forced to practice our bargaining skills with the locals, and of all days, I learned that bargaining really was not one of my strengths. I would often be able to talk the buyer down by 100元, sometimes even half the price they originally asked for. But when I asked Professor Geck about my purchases later, I found out that I still paid way more than I should have. Lesson of the day: Always bring a seasoned haggler with you when you’re shopping at the Silk Market. Although I did leave the Silk Market a bit upset at the thought of being ripped off, I also left thinking about a conversation I was able to have with one of the merchants’ assistants, a young girl who was about my age, maybe a few years older. She asked where my friend Katie and I were from, and when I told her I was from California and Katie was from Hawaii, she expressed her envy at our being from such popular places of the world. “I always hear about them. I always hear about the California sun. They say that in those places you really have a good life.” A good life? I thought about all of the times I would complain about the amount of school work I had to finish, about all of the midterms and finals I had to study for. Then I thought about how lucky I was to be able to go to school in the first place, to never have to worry about indoor plumbing, or using a toilet vs. a “squatter”. I thought about how lucky I was to be able to work at a job I enjoyed working at, as opposed to selling lower-quality counterfeit goods at a Silk Market in the middle of Beijing. Unsure of how to respond, I just nodded.

I didn’t get a chance to speak with her long afterward, but even later I couldn’t stop thinking about the cultural differences I had already seen between China and the US, and the differences in the living conditions and the amount of opportunities available in each country. My first day in China was definitely an amazing learning experience. I honestly can’t wait to see what Beijing and Shanghai have to show us next!

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— Goodbye Beijing, Hello Shanghai! Day 3 Update – Charlene Shi

I can’t believe our GLP trip is almost half over! That means Spring Break is just about halfway done too. Now to update you all on our Beijing adventures!

Our plane ride passed by relatively quickly as I slept through most of it. It was my first trip on Asiana Airlines, and I was pleasantly surprised by the delicious meals and wide leg room. In addition to sleeping, I also watched the movie “The Internship” and worked on my GE5 essay. For the first meal (dinner), I enjoyed the bibimbap, which is a Korean dish with rice, meat, and vegetables.

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It was a very hearty meal! After that, I had the spicy chicken thigh with rice for breakfast along with strawberry yogurt and a croissant.

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We had a two-hour layover in Incheon, South Korea; most of the GLP students took this opportunity to use the free wifi. Our flight from Incheon to Beijing was about two hours long, and we were served another meal. This time, it was rice with chicken and stir fried beef with soba noodles.

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Once we landed in Beijing, most of us were pretty awake due to the fact that we had slept for at least ten hours already. We met our tour guide, Benny, and we embarked on our journey to Beijing!

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First, we went to our spectacular hotel, the Beijing Marriott Hotel Northeast. This five-star hotel was gorgeous on the inside and outside, and our rooms were very spacious with all the amenities we wanted. My favorite part of the hotel was the large bathtub in the bathroom that took up about 50% of the entire bathroom. Sadly, I did not have a chance to use it.

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After my roommate Anna and I unpacked, we enjoyed a quick lunch across the street. We had rice cake with beef and seafood rice noodles. It was a very filling and delicious meal! Great way to start our adventure in Beijing. Next, we got on our bus and drove by the Olympic Village. The Bird’s Nest and Swimming Cube were even more impressive in real life. Both were such glorious works of architecture!

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We then went to the Temple of Heaven, where Benny took us on a quick tour throughout the spacious park and Temple. We also had a chance to walk around the park and watch the senior citizens play various card games, Chinese chess, and Chinese checkers in the park. It was such a lively place, much more exciting than American parks!

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Here we are with several Chinese dancers!

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After the Temple of Heaven, we enjoyed an informative tea ceremony, where we sampled a variety of teas, including lychee, green, fruit, jasmine, oolong, and flower tea. They were all delicious, but my favorite was green tea!

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Finally, Benny took us to the Silk Market, so we could practice our haggling skills first hand. Anna and I were interested in buying watches, Beats, purses, and scarves. The watches looked pretty cheap, and so did the Beats… We decided to just buy purses. I bought a purse that was originally 100RMB, but I used my haggling skills to negotiate all the way to 38RMB! This was through my use of Chinese, walking away from the sales person, and stating that someone else would sell it to me for cheaper! It was a really great opportunity to use my haggling skills first-hand! Anna bought a beautiful white purse and a silk scarf for very cheap! Many of the GLP girls bought purses, while the boys bought wallets and belts. Everyone came back to the bus very happy about their purchases! We returned to the hotel, and a few of my friends and I walked across the street to get dinner. We enjoyed a very delicious meal of beef noodle soup for only 15RMB (about $2.50).

The next day was our first full day of company visits! We started out with a delicious meal at the hotel! I didn’t realize how much I missed Chinese breakfast! We visited several companies these few days. On Monday, we toured Bimbo Bakeries, Hyundai, Yanjing Beer, and Cachet Pharmaceuticals.

Cesar Cruz from Bimbo Bakeries actually brought us these delicious croissants with chocolate filling!

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On Tuesday, we toured Wal-Mart, Shougang, Oglivy & Mather, and listened to Richard Robinson speak. My favorites have been Hyundai and Richard Robinson! Getting to tour the Hyundai factory was such an eye-opening experience. We walked through the assembly line and could see all the workers assembling the various parts of the car. Richard Robinson shared his experiences from backpacking through the world and doing odd jobs to being an entrepreneur and opening several multimillion dollar companies. My favorite part of this GLP trip has been touring all these companies. As business students and future business professionals, I love how we get to see first-hand the components of a business. So far, this trip has been very rewarding, an extraordinary experience for me to learn about business operations, practice my Chinese skills, and bond with my GLP family. I’m excited for what the next few days have to offer!

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— Day 1 Update- Zoe Willis

I survived the combined 15 hours in a plane, and now we’re all safely in Beijing! The flights both actually went by pretty fast as I slept through most of them! Definitely made an interesting choice in watching Gravity on a somewhat turbulent flight though which I don’t advise…

As soon as we landed at Beijing International Airport, we went through customs and got our luggage. From there we met up with our bus driver and our lovely tour guide, Benny. We went straight to the hotel which is definitely comparable to all of the other Mariott’s I’ve stayed at in the states. My roommate Jessica and I then ventured off to find lunch on our own. Jessica being vegetarian, and I being gluten free, had an interesting time ordering. Jessica got noodle soup and I ordered chicken curry. To our surprise, my chicken curry had a large amount of cheese on top (Which Jessica speculates may be due to me being so obviously American).

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After a quick shower, we all piled on the tour bus, eager to see our first bits of Beijing.We started by driving past the Olympic Park. The Bird Nest was even more grandiose than it appears on TV. The architecture is beyond captivating and it towers above all the other buildings in the area. We also passed the Water Cube, that while not lit up, was still impressive to look at. I learned that during the day, because the exterior is transparent, it relies solely on the sun for lighting.

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From there we drove to the Temple of Heaven. Historically, the temple was used during the Ming and Qing dynasties as a place for the emperor to offer prayers to heaven. The temple itself was stunning, but what I found to be more interesting were the people in the park surrounding it. There were hundreds of older Chinese people playing cards in groups, Chinese women dancing, and the most adorable little boy scootering. While there, we went to a tea house. As an avid tea drinker, I enjoyed sampling the various types of tea. My personal favorite was the lychee tea!

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After the temple of heaven, we got back on the bus and went to the Silk Market. It was definitely as I pictured it to be! There were floors and floors of knock off purses, shoes, electronics and clothing. I made the mistake early on of stopping to look at something. Two ladies approached me and physically grabbed my arms to get me to buy their items. Luckily my lovely roommate Jessica speaks Chinese and eventually got them off me. Bartering was an exciting experience, and Jessica and I were successful in getting a few really neat things for next to nothing.

For dinner, I went with a group to a hot pot restaurant nearby. At that point we were all jet lagged, but had a good time nonetheless. On the walk there, I encountered my first Beijing traffic experience. I made the mistake of thinking that pedestrians had the right of way, and literally was so close to getting hit. I definitely cannot get away with the pedestrian habits I exhibit back home (including texting while walking). You really have to be aware of what’s going on; they are not afraid to hit you!

Despite being exhausted, I had an amazing day in Beijing. It’s vastly different from the US in many ways, but there is so much to explore!

*Thank you to the lovely Jessica Zhou for her amazing pictures!

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— So Close to Take Off!- Zoe Willis

Hi, I’m Zoe! I’m currently a freshman at the USC Marshall School of Business studying Business Administration and Music Industry. I’m originally from Olympia, Washington which is about as different from China as you can get! I’ve traveled to numerous countries in South America and Europe, but have never been anywhere in Asia. I’m really excited to experience such a vastly different place. I’m a pretty adventurous traveler, so hopefully other GLPers will be willing to explore the city in a bold (but safe!) way. I think the greatest challenge for me personally will be the language barrier. I speak some Spanish and even less Japanese, but literally about two phrases of Mandarin! Luckily my lovely roommate Jessica is fluent, which should be a big help.

In 30 minutes I’ll be meeting up with other GLPers to embark on what could possibly be the most adventurous Spring Break ever! I may not be going to Cabo or Palm Springs, but this is better! Over the next week I’ll not only be introduced to the great cities of Shanghai and Beijing, but be able to network with executives at some great companies as well.

 Personally I am excited to learn about how business differs abroad, and to see if China will be a good fit for me to intern in over the summer. My group is getting the chance to meet with people at Ogilvy & Mather, Zynga, SC Johnson, and numerous other corporations. I’m definitely most looking forward to Ogilvy & Mather as advertising is an area of business that interests me. Of course I could read about all of these companies online, but being able to physically go abroad to these companies and see what their day to day operations are like is going to be such an amazing experience.

I remember at the start of the semester meeting with everyone in GLP during Welcome Week. I knew that GLP was going to be a great opportunity, but I had no idea what to expect. Now that my year in GLP is almost coming to a close, I can safely say that it has been one of the greatest parts of my freshman year. The friendships I’ve made and opportunities that have been extended to me truly are unique to GLP. I feel so grateful to be part of such an amazing program- and the best is yet to come!

Hopefully I survive the 15 hours in a plane I’m about to endure…

-Zoe

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— [Amy] At the Beginning

As a freshman coming into USC, I really wasn’t sure what to expect from college. I was excited and nervous, both looking forward to and dreading my first week of classes. Nearly 8 months later, I’m nearly finished with freshman year, and just a week away from Spring Break, I’m ready to bring what I’ve learned from SC thousands of miles with me to China.


About Me

Hi everyone! My name is Amy Chau, and I’m a freshman majoring in Business Administration. I was born and raised in sunny Southern California— more specifically, I’ve lived most of my life in San Diego. I’ve actually never been to China before— or anywhere in the Eastern Hemisphere, for that matter— so as you can imagine, I’m both extremely excited and nervous for this trip (it’s like first semester all over again!) That being said, my Mandarin is, at best, elementary. I know a few words here and there, but my vocabulary is limited, and I’ll most likely be looking to more proficient Mandarin-speakers during our trip.

I’m definitely looking forward to learning more about the companies we’ve researched in class. As GLP students, we have the great opportunity to tour and meet with companies such as Hyundai, Wal-Mart, Ogilvy & Mather, Zynga, SC Johnson, Volvo and about 20 more!

Aside from the academic and business portion of our trip, I also can’t wait to explore the cultural aspect of China. I’m looking forward to our Beijing Tour of the Olympic Village (北京奥运村), Beijing Park (北海公园), and the Silk Market (秀水街) and our group visit to the Great Wall (长城), Forbidden City (紫禁城), and Wangfujing (王府井大街).


Pre-Trip Planning

During class last Friday, we were given a pre-trip presentation on things to know for our visit to China. For those of you who missed it, here’s a small summary of points brought up in the presentation.

Things to Know:

  • Beijing and Shanghai are 16 hours ahead of PST

  • Average temperature in March: Low 32 to High 53 (Beijing), Low 41 to High 55 (Shanghai)

  • Occasional showers & Mild humidity

  • Electrical Current: 110V & 220V

  • Currency: $1 = 6.1377元

Don’t forget to bring:

  • Charge Converter (to keep my electronics from exploding!)

  • Plug Adapter (for the different outlet shape)

  • Two photocopies of ID, Passport, Credit Cards, I20 (leave one at home!)

  • Umbrella

  • Business Professional Clothing

  • Comfortable clothing, warm layers

  • Comfortable shoes

  • Small duffle bag


With a midterm on Thursday, I’m going to hold off on packing for a couple of days, but with a thorough list, hopefully I’ll be well-prepared for the trip.

The next week or so is going to have so much going on. I hope my fellow bloggers and I will be able to give you a good look into what the Global Leadership Program is all about, and what it’s like to travel to and do business in China.


Until next time!

Amy


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